Posts Tagged ‘extremism’

h1

Fabricated Case of Lal Masjid / Jamia Hafsa – EXCLUSIVE

October 14, 2013

By Usman Sheikh

In another absurd move, the former President of Pakistan has been arrested again on the basis of the allegation that he “killed” the mother of the terrorist Ghazi brothers (along with the younger Ghazi brother). It is as if the former President rolled up his sleeves, pressed the trigger or ordered the soldiers on the ground to ensure only one of the Ghazi brothers was killed, along with his mother, whilst all the unarmed students, women and kids were successfully rescued.

Below is a very brief and quick summary of the main points:

Q. Thousands of innocent women and children were killed during the Lal Masjid operation and chemical weapons were used

A. 

1. Lie.

* Only one non-combatant was killed: the elderly mother of the terrorist Ghazi brothers. She was killed in the cross fire in the basement of the Lal Masjid

* We know of no other unarmed civilian who was killed in this operation

* Altogether, 103 people were killed in the Lal Masjid operation, of which 11 were security officials

Lal Masjid Commission Report

[Note: The Lal Masjid Commission Report gives a lie to the assertion that “thousands” or “hundreds” of “women and children” were killed in the operation. It also highlights the fact that a) the Lal Masjid / Jamia Hafsa management were preaching and involved in terrorist activities; b) were actively supporting terrorists; c) initiated hostilities d) had a long history of involvement in dodgy activities; e) were not merely demanding the reconstruction of 7 illegally built masajid, but were also demanding the imposition of their weird version of the sharia upon the whole of Pakistan (including demanding the imposition of the Saudi system in Pakistan)]

2. Islamic law does not permit any Tom, Dick, or Harry to take the law into his/her own hands. Neither does it permit any individual to wage (offensive) jihad and to oppose the State, particularly when doing so would cause bloodshed and mayhem.

3. Pakistani authorities negotiated with the terrorists of the Lal Masjid / Jamia Hafsa for many months, trying their best to reach a peaceful resolution. They even agreed to reconstruct the illegally built masajid. Yet the management of Lal Masjid / Jamia Hafsa refused to accept a peaceful settlement and even dismissed the requests of the Wafaqul Madaris

4. These terrorists had threatened to launch suicide attacks, had encouraged members to throw acid upon the female students in the Quaid-e-Azam University, illegally occupied buildings (including a library), burnt the Ministry of Environment building and stored weapons and explosives in the masjid. They destroyed shops, kidnapped and tortured people and kidnapped police officers on multiple occasions. The Ghazi brothers openly threatened suicide bombings and boasted about their close contacts with the TTP and individuals such as Baitullah Mehsud. Ignoring the statements of the

Imam of Kaaba, Taqiuddin Usmani and dismissing the efforts of the Wafaqul Madaris and many others, they began making completely unreasonable and unrealistic demands, including the imposition of the Saudi system in Pakistan. But still the Pakistan authorities continued negotiating with them.

5. Forces on the ground decided to act once the students of the Lal Masjid and Jamia Hafsa killed a Ranger and conducted other destructive activities.

6. As explained by the Lal Masjid Commission Report, no heavy machinery was used by the Pakistani forces. The Commission compared this operation with the operation conducted to liberate the Kaaba in 1979. In the latter, heavy machinery and tanks were used, resulting in hundreds of casualties. In the former, in sharp contrast, all the women, girls and unarmed civilians were rescued by the Pakistani forces and, thereafter, a careful and cautious operation was conducted to eliminate the armed terrorists.

Lal Masjid terrorists

White Phosphorous Grenade allegation

A. No chemical weapon was used in the lal masjid operation

B. The army uses a grenade called SMOKE DISCHARGE/GRENADE WP P3 MK1, locally produced in POF and is used for smoke screening purposes in battles. It is an ordinary grenade and not a chemical weapon.

C. White phosphorus grenades were used to create smoke to enable the soldiers move inside the premises.

D. No lethal application of White phosphorous was made in the operation.

Lal Masjid - Suicide BombersClick here for some forgotten facts about the Lal masjid. (Must Watch)

Click here to read the exclusive article written by President Musharraf, “Lal Masjid- Shifting Truth from Lies” and “Behind the walls of the Laal Masjid” by Naeem Tahir.

“Lal Masjid has 10,000 suicide bombers” – A blunt confession by Molana Abdul Aziz.

h1

Musharraf draws five-point agenda for checking extremism within Pakistan

June 10, 2011

Washington, June 9 (ANI): Former Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf has come up with a five-point agenda for checking extremism within the country.

The former military ruler acknowledged that Pakistan also has to look inwards to resolve its sociopolitical conflict.

“We, as a nation, have to boldly demonstrate our resolve towards moderation and rejection of extremism from within our society. We have to follow, with courage, the five-point agenda that I created to check extremism within,” Musharraf wrote in a piece for CNN.

He said that the misuse of madrassas and mosques from preaching militancy of any form must be stopped.

No material spreading violence and militancy should be printed/published and sold or distributed, he added.

Musharraf also called for banning militant religious organisations and dening their reemergence under different names.

He also emphasised on the need to keep the religious syllabus and curriculum in schools under constant review to “prevent any teaching of controversial issues, which could lead to religious rigidity, extremism and intolerance.”

The implementation of a madrassa strategy to “mainstream Taliban into the social fabric of the nation” constituted Musharraf’s fifth agenda to check extremism in Pakistan.

The former president, however, acknowledged that all these points are easier said than done, saying that it needs a government that “comprehends the magnitude of the task, has the following of the people and the determination to change.”

Musharraf, who launched the All Pakistan Muslim League (PML) party in late 2010 with a view to running for office in 2013, said that in the present political scenario, none of the political parties or their leaders has the acumen to achieve such lofty ideals.

“We face an acute leadership vacuum. This has to be filled. We have to break the political status quo. We have to produce a political alternative to be seen domestically and internationally as viable and take it to victory through democratic means,” he said.

“Time is of essence for Pakistan. Too much water has flown under the bridge. The next elections will be the mother of all elections,” added Musharraf, who has vowed to return to Pakistan by March 23 next year to contest the upcoming general elections.

Source: Daily India

h1

Musharraf: More Troops in Afghanistan

September 25, 2009
By CHRIS CUOMO, CHRIS STRATHMANN and KATE McCARTHY [ABC News]

President Musharraf - The Hope for Progressive PakistanFormer Pakistani president Gen. Pervez Musharraf said that President Obama should have complied “yesterday” with Gen. Stanley A. McChyrstal’s recommendation to send more U.S. troops to Afghanistan.

“I think you should take it immediately. You should have taken it yesterday,” Musharraf told ABC News in an exclusive interview.

Musharraf made his comments following the leak of McChrystal’s security assessment that called for additional U.S. troops to fight in Afghanistan. In the assessment, McChrystal said more troops alone cannot achieve success “but will enable implementation of the new strategy. Conversely, inadequate resources will likely result in failure.”

In February, Obama authorized an additional 21,000 troops be deployed to Afghanistan and now he must decide if the situation requires even more.

Musharraf said he “absolutely” believes there need to be more troops in Afghanistan.

Sending more troops could also mean an increase in casualties, something Musharraf says the United States should be prepared for.

“We must avoid, as much as possible, casualties. But when soldiers move and armies act, casualties will be there, and we should accept casualties,” Musharraf said.

“We have to win,” the former general said. “And quitting is not an option.”

Musharraf even proposed what he called a “drastic” measure to secure the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan.

“As far as I’m concerned, we should mine it so that people can’t go across,” Musharraf said.

While he acknowledged that mines are a controversial weapon, Musharraf argued that it is an “unusual war.”

Musharraf dismissed Afghanistan’s long history of defeating foreign armies, including the Soviet army in the 1980s.

“There’s always a first time,” Musharraf said.

He argued the United States could succeed where the Soviets failed because “the whole world” was helping insurgents fight the Soviets.

At another point, the former Pakistani general said, “It was you who invaded and came into Afghanistan, so you better face it now and win there.”

When asked what the consequences would be if the United States withdrew from Afghanistan, Musharraf said it would result in destabilizing Afghanistan. He said the country would become the center of all al Qaeda “sanctuaries” and consequently could extend its influence into Pakistan and possibly even India.

Musharraf said he believes Obama has “intentions of improvement” since taking office.

“He’s saying the right things. He wants to focus more on Afghanistan, compared to Iraq, which is the right strategy at this moment,” Musharraf said. “He wants to reach out to the Muslims.”

Musharraf added that “we need to see [results] on ground.

Returning to Pakistan

Musharraf came to power in 1999 following a military coup and resigned in 2008 amid threats of impeachment after he removed a Supreme Court judge from the bench and imposed emergency rule on the country.

The former president said he “will return to Pakistan” despite the possibility of facing trial as soon as he sets foot in the country.

“Well, these are realities which one has to face. But however, I am very sure of one thing — that whatever I have done till now, constitutionally and legally, there is no charge against me,” Musharraf said.

When asked if he would try to return to power, Musharraf would not answer the question directly.

“Well, I give thought to what is happening in Pakistan. And I give thought to what the people of Pakistan are desiring, and I also give thought to whether I can do anything for Pakistan,” Musharraf said. “Collectively, I have to make a decision based on all these three elements.”

The former general, who is currently living in exile in London, is prohibited by law from running for political office until this December, two years after he took off his military uniform.

Should Musharraf decide to return to politics, he likely would face Nawaz Sharif, a political opponent and someone the former president called “abrasive” and confrontational.

“He has never been on good terms with any president of Pakistan, so I don’t know what kind of a mental make-up he has. But the man is abrasive against the other power brokers of Pakistan,” Musharraf said.

The former general even went so far as to call Sharif a “closet Taliban.”

“Even on Pakistan television these days, talk shows are going on saying that he has met Osama bin Laden five times — five times before 9/11 — and he has been financed by Osama bin Laden,” Musharraf said. “Then the other element is that he never speaks against terrorism and extremism.”

But when pressed for proof of Sharif’s meetings with bin Laden, Musharraf said he personally could not offer any.

“No, I can’t do that, but there are certainly there are people who vouch for it, who were present there,” Musharraf said.

Source: ABC News

h1

Danger for Pakistan, India if US quits Afghanistan: Musharraf

September 25, 2009

* Washington must immediately send more troops to Afghanistan, be ready for casualties
* Calls Nawaz ‘closet Taliban’, says PML-N chief never speaks against terrorism, extremism

Daily Times Monitor

President MusharrafLAHORE: Pakistan and India will face great danger from Al Qaeda if the United States pulls out of Afghanistan, former president Pervez Musharraf said on Thursday.

In an exclusive interview with ABC News, Musharraf said a US pullout would result in an unstable Afghanistan.

“The country [Afghanistan] will become the centre of all Al Qaeda sanctuaries and consequently could extend its influence into Pakistan and possibly even India,” Musharraf said.

Troops: To a question on the US consideration of sending more troops to Afghanistan, he said US President Obama should have complied with Gen Stanley McChyrstal’s recommendation “yesterday”. “I think you should take it immediately. You should have taken it yesterday,” Musharraf said.

Musharraf said he “absolutely” believed there needed to be more troops in Afghanistan. But he said sending more troops could mean an increase in casualties, something the US should be prepared for.

“We must avoid casualties, as much as possible. But when soldiers move and armies act, casualties will be there, and we should accept casualties,” he said.

He said the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan should be mined, a proposition he termed “drastic”.

“As far as I’m concerned, we should mine it so that people can’t go across,” Musharraf said.

He called PML-N chief Nawaz Sharif “abrasive” and confrontational.

“He has never been on good terms with any president of Pakistan,” he said, adding that Nawaz was a “closet Taliban”.

“Even on Pakistan Television these days, talk shows are going on saying that he has met Osama Bin Laden five times – five times before 9/11 – and he has been financed by Osama,” Musharraf said. “Then the other element is that he never speaks against terrorism and extremism.”

Source: Daily Times

h1

SPIEGEL-INTERVIEW WITH PERVEZ MUSHARRAF

June 7, 2009

In a SPIEGEL interview, former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, 65, discusses the dramatic situation in Pakistan, where army troops are fighting Islamist extremists in the Swat Valley, his people’s ambivalent relationship with the United States and his country’s failures in combating the Taliban.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Musharraf, there’s a bon mot that states that ruling Pakistan is like riding a tiger. You were in power for nine years. Are you bored now?

Musharraf: I recently was in Saudi Arabia, China and London giving lectures. I have engaged the famous Walker Agency …

SPIEGEL: … which Bill Clinton, Tony Blair and Gerhard Schröder all work with …

Musharraf: … In Prague, I am giving a lecture on leadership in front of high-level managers at a company which owns Pizza Hut and KFC.

SPIEGEL: Pakistan is in a major state of crisis. Close to 2.5 million people have fled the areas of fighting in the northwest and the Swat Valley. There are attacks almost daily. Is Pakistan on the verge of collapse?

Pervez MusharrafMusharraf: This is wrong. Nothing can happen to Pakistan as long as the armed forces are intact and strong. Anyone who wants to weaken and destabilize Pakistan just has to weaken the army and our intelligence service, ISI, and this is what is happening these days. Lots of articles have been written claiming that Pakistan will be divided, that it will fall apart or become Balkanized. I personally feel there is some kind of conspiracy going on with the goal of weakening our nation.

SPIEGEL: Who do you believe is behind this conspiracy?

Musharraf: I won’t tell you exactly because then you will ask me for evidence. I can only tell you that India, for example, has 16 insurgencies going on and nobody is making a big thing out of it. But the West always focuses on Pakistan as the problem.

SPIEGEL: United States President Barack Obama has promised a new beginning. He wants to chase and fight the Taliban and al-Qaida in Pakistan as well as Afghanistan and has enlargened the territory of operations. What do you think of this new strategy, which he calls AfPak?

Musharraf: I am totally against the term AfPak. I do not support the word itself for two reasons: First, the strategy puts Pakistan on the same level as Afghanistan. We are not. Afghanistan has no government and the country is completely destabilized. Pakistan is not. Second, and this is much more important, is that there is an Indian element in the whole game. We have the Kashmir struggle, without which extremist elements like Lashkar-e-Taiba would not exist.

SPIEGEL: This group is believed to have been responsible for the terrorist attacks in Mumbai. Why should the US strategy also include India?

Musharraf: There are many Indian extremists who have links with extremists in Pakistan. So if the world is serious about combating terrorism, then don’t leave India out. Originally, Richard Holbrooke was supposed to be the US special representative for all three countries, but the strong Indian lobby in America prevented that.

SPIEGEL: Are you disappointed by Obama?

Musharraf: No, he is aiming at the right things. He is showing intentions of improving the dialogue with the Muslim world, which is good. He is right when he says that more forces must be deployed in Afghanistan. There is an intention of increasing funding for Pakistan, which is also good. But he also has to understand the reality in Pakistan and I am not sure he does.

SPIEGEL: And how is the situation?

Musharraf: One of the realities is that the Indian intelligence service RAW is interfering in our country. For example in Balochistan, our largest province bordering Iran and Afghanistan. One of the most brutal insurgents against our forces, Brahamdagh Bugti …

SPIEGEL: … the grandson of Nawab Bugti, a tribal leader who was killed three years ago in a battle with the Pakistani army …

Musharraf: … he is sitting in Kabul, protected by the Afghan government and provided with weapons and money by the Indian intelligence agency RAW. He has his own training camps and sends his fighters to Balochistan where they terrorize people and damage the civil infrastructure. RAW is also interfering in the Swat Valley, I know that. Where do all these Taliban fighters in Swat get their arms and money from? From Afghanistan. The Indian consulates in Jallalabad and Kandahar only exist to be a thorn in the side of Pakistan.

SPIEGEL: Let us talk about the role of the ISI. A short time ago, US newspapers reported that ISI has systematically supported Taliban groups. Is that true?

Musharraf: Intelligence always has access to other networks — this is what Americans did with KGB, this is what ISI also does. You should understand that the army is on board to fight the Taliban and al-Qaida. I have always been against the Taliban. Don’t try to lecture us about how we should handle this tactically. I will give you an example: Siraj Haqqani …

SPIEGEL: … a powerful Taliban commander who is allegedly secretly allied with the ISI.

Musharraf: He is the man who has influence over Baitullah Mehsud, a dangerous terrorist, the fiercest commander in South Waiziristan and the murderer of Benazir Bhutto as we know today. Mehsud kidnapped our ambassador in Kabul and our intelligence used Haqqani’s influence to get him released. Now, that does not mean that Haqqani is supported by us. The intelligence service is using certain enemies against other enemies. And it is better to tackle them one by one than making them all enemies.

SPIEGEL: Are the Americans and the Pakistanis still even pursuing the same goals?

Musharraf: The Americans are hated in the country today. The US drone attacks, which we have been living with for months now, are most unpopular — there is no doubt about it. Regardless whether they are killing terrorists, Taliban or Al-Qaida-figures or not, there are too many civilian victims. The deployment of drones has to be stopped.

SPIEGEL: The US military eliminated several high-ranking al-Qaida figures through drone attacks. What would be a possible alternative?

Musharraf: We have to find a way or method with which the Pakistani army could conduct these attacks itself. There would immediately be much better acceptance amongst the populace and we would cause less collateral damage and there would be fewer civilian victims.

SPIEGEL: If you were still in power, would you order attacks against powerful Taliban leaders?

Musharraf: I would not hesitate one second.

SPIEGEL: Even attacks on Taliban chief Mullah Omar, Osama bin Laden or influential Haqqani?

Musharraf: Certainly. The only thing I was concerned about was apprehending Osama bin Laden and putting him on trial within Pakistan. You need to understand the sensitivities in our country.

SPIEGEL: You yourself have been accused of distinguishing between good and bad Taliban — those fighting against Western and Afghan forces and those who attack the Pakistani army and police.

Musharraf: That is wrong, I fought all of them without distinction. But please understand that every action has political repercussions. You accuse me of not having taken action, but things are not always black and white — sometimes they are gray. I will give you an example, the Red Mosque, where religious militants assembled with their students in July 2007. Why didn’t I attack them earlier? The Red Mosque is located in an area that, politically, is dominated by Jamaat-i-Islami, a party which can bring masses of people to the streets all over Pakistan …

SPIEGEL: … and a party which in former times had been your political partner …

Musharraf: No, they have never been our political partner. Please understand, there are 14 madrasses in Islamabad and Rawalpindi. There would have been social unrest if we had immediately attacked the Red Mosque. We wanted to avoid a bloody tragedy and solve it peacefully. But we didn’t succeed and in the end we had to act. We undertook a military operation that resulted in under 100 deaths. There is currently a parallel case in Karachi. We know there is a madrassa with armed militants inside in a neighborhood called Banoori Town. Shall we go there, collect the weapons and just kill them all? Yes, it can be done. But then we would provoke significant ethnic vilence in Karachi. Therefore, it is not appropriate to do this at this time.

SPIEGEL: Is Pakistan now paying for its earlier failures? Why didn’t you eliminate the Taliban leadership when they came to Pakistan at the end of 2001 — above all the so-called Quetta Shura, the Taliban’s highest decision-making council, in the Pakistani city Quetta?

Musharraf: The Quetta Shura never existed. Do you really think there is an assembly in a kind of a house where they come and discuss things in something like a regular consultation? Mullah Omar never was in Pakistan and he would be mad if he appeared there. He is much safer in Afghanistan.

SPIEGEL: Over the last eight years, Pakistan has received about $10 billion in military aid from the US. Apparently you didn’t spend all that money on the war on terror — some went to secure your eastern border with India. Is that true?

Musharraf: Half of it, $5 billion, was reimbursed to us for services we had already rendered to the US. You have to understand how the Pakistan army operates: The divisions keep moving. If we buy new tanks for $250 million, then they will be deployed in Peshawar as part of the war on terror, but they will also go to the eastern border. But why do you care about that? Why, for heaven’s sake, should I tell you how we spent the money?

SPIEGEL: The American government would surely be interested in knowing.

Musharraf: I also told the Americans that it has nothing to do with them. We are not obligated to give out any details. Maybe I should have said at the time: Ok, you want us to support you, give us $20 billion a year and don’t ask what we are doing with it.

SPIEGEL: Why is it so hard for Pakistan to recognize the war against terror as its own war?

Musharraf: I do agree, they do not accept this war as their war. This has something to do with history. Please understand the reason, and you should blame the US for it. From 1979 to 1989, we fought a war with the US in Afghanistan against the Soviet Union. And we won mainly because of ISI. Otherwise, the Soviet Union could not have been defeated in Afghanistan. But then the US left us all alone with 30,000 mujahedeen brought by them. Even Osama bin Laden was brought by the US, who else? They all came to fight the Soviet Union. So, did anybody in Washington develop a strategy for what to do with these people after 1989? No, nobody helped Pakistan for the next 12 years until 2001. We were left high and dry, with 30,000 mujahedeen holed up, no rehabilitation, no resettlement for them. No assistance was given to Pakistan — instead sanctions were imposed against us. Fourty F-16s, for which we had paid money, were denied to us. Four million Afghan refugees had also come to Pakistan. The mujahedeed coalesced into al-Qaida and our social fabric was being completely destroyed. This is why the people of Pakistan felt used by the Americans, and this is why Pakistanis dislike the US and this war.

SPIEGEL: Even today, you are one of George W. Bush’s last friends. Al-Qaida leaders like Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind of 9/11, and logistics director Abu el-Subaida, were arrested and then tortured on Pakistani soil. In retrospect, do you consider this to have been an error?

Musharraf: I would not like to comment. I would just like to say that I am completely against torture. People in the West have to understand that we were not fighting a war in Germany or the United Kingdom. Under very unusual circumstances we had to deal with people who were vicious. You should not get into details of how we were fighting, how we were handling the war.

SPIEGEL: Terrorism, military coups, territoral conflicts — since its independence 62 years ago, Pakistan has been in a state of perpetual crisis. But you did come close to solving at least one problem in secret negotiations with India: the conflict in Kashmir. What went wrong in the end?

Musharraf: We were close to an agreement with India. My proposal was the demilitarization of the disputed area, self-governance and a mutual overwatch. The key irritant was the line of control which the Indians wanted to make permanent. I said we should make it irrelevant by opening transit routes. And that is where the situation stands.

SPIEGEL: A few weeks ago, you visited New Delhi and said India and Pakistan have done enough damage to each other and that it is time to find a solution. Do you view yourself as as a future ambassador for peace between the two countries?

Musharraf: If the Pakistan government wants me and if the Indians also trust me, then I can be of some use.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Musharraf, we thank for this interview.

Source: http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,628960,00.html

h1

Musharraf blames USA for Trust Deficit

April 27, 2009

Pervez Musharraf with David FrostApril 24, 2009: FORMER Pakistani President, Pervez Musharraf, blames the United States for what he believes is a ‘trust deficit’ between the two countries.

He says that President Obama has not helped change the US attitude towards Pakistan and that there are very few differences between President Obama and his predecessor. He has also called for Pakistan to take control of the US drones and argued that the Swat Valley must remain in the Pakistani legal system.

Speaking exclusively to Sir David Frost for “Frost Over The World” on Al Jazeera English, he was asked if there was a healthy relationship between Pakistan and the US. “No,” he replied.

“There is, unfortunately, a trust deficit … the worst part of the whole situation is there’s a trust deficit in the United States against the ISI; and in many quarters against the army… These are the two institutions which are the guarantors of stability of Pakistan… Now if you are to fight terrorism and extremism, and these two institutions are to be mistrusted, who in Pakistan is going to fight terrorism and extremism?”

When asked if he thought things had changed for the better under President Obama, he said: “I don’t see any change really. I mean, what are the changes as far as terrorism and extremism is concerned, and as far as our region and Afghanistan is concerned? There is no change. Force is required. He has taken the decision to send more force. So what was happening in the past? There was force requirement and he is following exactly the same strategy.”

Former President Musharraf’s comments came as US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemned Pakistan for allowing extremists to control the Swat Valley in north-western Pakistan, resulting in a “mortal threat” to world security.

When asked by Sir David Frost whether he agreed with the current Pakistani government conceding to the Taliban in allowing Sharia law in the Swat Valley, Musharraf said: “Any compromise on a position of strength when you are dealing with them is the wrong way. We must deal politically, but from a position of strength… If it is outside that legal structure you cannot have a challenge to the writ of the Government… Speedy, cheap justice must be ensured within the legal ambit of Pakistan, and the constitution of Pakistan. Denying the constitution of Pakistan, and bringing laws which are different from Pakistan, must not be allowed. “

He also claimed that the Taliban was a greater threat than Al Qaeda, saying: “They get their strength from the population. Al Qaeda doesn’t get strength from the population.”

Musharraf also called for the US drones that patrol Pakistan to be brought under the control of the Pakistani government, arguing that Pakistan does not have the technology available to fight terrorism.

“We cannot allow any foreign force to attack on our side of the border. We must use our own forces. And whatever resources are lacking, Pakistan must be given those resources. What these drones see are obviously much more than we have through human intelligence. We bank on human intelligence, and also some technical intelligence.”

The former President did not dismiss the possibility of returning to power, saying: “Pakistan comes first. I hope and pray that the government that handles Pakistan does well for Pakistan. Progress and development of the state, the welfare and wellbeing of its people.

“If they can ensure this, I’ll be the happiest man. But if this is not ensured, and Pakistan is on a nosedive or a self-destruct mechanism is on… then if I can contribute something to rectify the situation, certainly I will. My life is for the country; for Pakistan.”

Musharraf also spoke of two secret meetings he had held with Benazir Bhutto in Abu Dhabi, in which he claims he warned her twice not to return to Pakistan for fear of assassination.

“She was not supposed to return before the elections… And I told her personally that there were threats. Very, very important threats… She ignored all that… And unfortunately they made a lot of hue and cry against me that I was not allowing her political activity. But it was simply a threat to her life! The next time then she ignored all that. I said, ‘Okay, if she wants to go, let her go! She’s not understanding.’ And then you know what happened.”

Source: http://www.theasiannews.co.uk

h1

Musharraf To China: Play A More Proactive Role (EXCLUSIVE)

April 13, 2009

Pakistan’s Friends roll out the Red Carpet for a Pakistani Nationalist Statesman-Pervez Musharraf

 

Pervez Musharraf in ChinaThroughout his trip in China, former President Musharraf was accorded head of state protocol and extensive security. In-between lectures, he was invited to several banquets by various provincial governors and senior Chinese Communist Party officials. He continues to be very popular among the Chinese younger generation.

 

   Says Obama’s Af-Pak policy is incomplete without resolving Kashmir dispute

   Calls for linking Pakistan with China through fiber optic, rail, oil, gas pipelines; through Karakoram Highway

   Floats the idea of a Iran-Pakistan-China (IPC) pipeline

  

An AhmedQuraishi.com REPORT

Saturday, 11 April 2009.

WWW.AHMEDQURAISHI.COM

 

Beijing, China—Former President of Pakistan, Gen. (R) Pervez Musharraf continued his international lecture tour with several engagements in key Chinese cities.  [For pictures, click Pic1, Pic2, Pic3]

 

For this tour in China, the former President was invited by the government of China, through the Chinese People’s Institute of Foreign Affairs (CPIFA).

 

His first lecture was in Beijing to CPIFA, attended by many Chinese Ambassadors, experts on South Asia, and graduate students. The former President’s lecture focused on the deep relationship between Pakistan and China, and an in-depth analysis of regional issues including Afghanistan, India, terrorism and extremism. The former President stressed the need for closer global cooperation to defeat terrorism and extremism, and a more proactive role for China.

 

His next lecture was in Shanghai, with the prestigious Shanghai Institute for International Studies. The President addressed Chinese experts on South Asia, Asia Pacific, and the United States. This exclusive lecture was to the top intellectuals and think tank strategists from China. The discussion following the lecture focused on Pak-China relationship, terrorism and extremism, and the potential to increase the Sino-Pak economic cooperation. In the question and answer session, the Chinese intellectuals were keen to know the former President’s view on the new American ‘AfPak’ strategy. The President broadly endorsed the strategy, as it is the continuation of the past. However, he said this new strategy remains incomplete without India, and the resolution of the Kashmir dispute. India was excluded by President Obama from this new strategy after heavy lobbying from the Indian-American community.

 

The former President’s final stop was at Sichuan University in Chengdu where he addressed several hundred students and faculty. His speech was an overview of the historic relationship between Pakistan and China, an overview of the Pakistan-Afghanistan region, and the impact of the global economic crisis on the developing world. After the speech there was an exciting interaction between the students and the former President. To one student’s question on deepening the Pakistan-China relationship, the former President spoke of his vision to expand the Karakorum Highway (KKH) to include rail links, oil and gas pipelines, and a new fiber optic cable link. He suggested that not only should Pakistan do the Iran-Pakistan-India pipeline (IPI), but also an ‘IPC’, Iran-Pakistan-China pipeline for gas and oil.

 

The students were also very interested to learn from the President his insights into developing moral character and leadership skills.

 

Throughout his trip in China, former President Musharraf was accorded head of state protocol and extensive security. In-between lectures, he was invited to several banquets by various provincial governors and senior Chinese Communist Party officials. At each venue the former President expressed his appreciation for the warm reception, and the sense of admiration shown by all strata of Chinese, whether it was in meetings at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, or in the streets of Shanghai.

 

The former President has a relatively full schedule of speaking engagements for the rest of the year, most likely taking him to Europe and North America in the coming months.

%d bloggers like this: